The Marriage Story: NY Times says that in custody battles parents are called on “to make cartoon villains of each other.” 12/23/2019. True? In Connecticut?

For discussion attend the shared parenting symposium at the CT Legislative Office building on Friday January 24, 1-4pm, room 1C . See the Marriage Story with Adam Driver and Scarlett Johansson. For more information, search Symposium at www.sharedparentinginc.org.

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Hear Legislators Speak about Shared Parenting, Fri. Jan 24, Hartford, CT

A symposium entitled Reducing Parental Conflict and Risk of Harm to Children will take place at the CT Legislative Office building on Friday January 24, 1-4pm, room 1C.  Please pass this information to others interested in shared parenting.

Our two keynote speakers, professor Emily Douglas at Worcester Polytechnical Institute and professor Martin Kulldorff at Harvard Medical School, will address scientific evidence on shared parenting, domestic violence and risk of harm to children.

One of the nation’s leading experts on domestic violence, Dr. Emily Douglas is professor and chair of the Department of Social Science and Policy Studies at Worcester Polytechnic. In 2016-2017 she was a Congressional fellow in Washington, D.C., dually sponsored by the Society for Research in Child Development and the American Association for the Advancement of Science and Technology. She will talk about risk factors for child abuse and filicide.

An epidemiological methods developer, Dr. Martin Kulldorff is a statistician and professor of medicine at Harvard University. He will give an overview of the scientific evidence on the impact on children of shared parenting and other custody arrangements.

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CT judge rules for more time with the non-residential parent

In a recent Connecticut case, the judge ruled for extra father time based on the 16 factors defining best interests of the child. Importantly, the judge ruled that a major change in circumstances is NOT required in order to change parenting time. The judges decision says:

In modifying visitation, there is no requirement that the court find as a threshold matter that a substantial change in circumstances has occurred. Szczerkowski v. Karmelowicz, 60 Conn. App. 429, 433, 759 A.2d 1050 (2000). “In making or modifying any order as provided in subsection (a) of [General Statutes Section 46b-56], the rights and responsibilities of both parents shall be considered and the court shall enter orders accordingly that serve the best interests of the child and provide the child with the active and consistent involvement of both parents commensurate with their abilities and interests.”

This case signals that judges are not willing to defer to the wishes of the primary residential parent when more time with the other parent is available. The attorney for the father went through each of the 16 factors to show that the change in parenting time was in the best interests of the child.Facebooktwittergoogle_plusmailby feather

Do you Agree with Kansas Shared Parenting Bill?

A bill before the Kansas legislature in 2019 says, in part:

(c) (1) If there is presentation of documentation or other
information by a parent that would support a finding of good cause that
domestic abuse has occurred or is occurring, there shall be a
presumption that it is not in the best interests of the child for the parents
to have temporary joint legal custody and share equally in parenting
time.
(2) In making an order for a temporary parenting plan, there shall be
a presumption that it is in the best interests of the child for fit, willing and
able parents to have temporary joint legal custody and share equally in
parenting time.

Full text of the bill is at: http://kslegislature.org/li/b2019_20/measures/documents/sb157_01_0000.pdf

Agree that Kansas Defines Domestic Abuse Appropriately?

 

Agree with Kansas' Presumption of Shared Parenting?

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Which is the better shared parenting law?

In 2018, Virginia passed a law requiring judges to consider shared parenting on a basis equal to sole or primary custody. This promises to change the current practice of awarding sole or primary custody in 85% of cases. Do you support that shared parenting should be an equal alternative to sole or primary custody?

In 2018, Kentucky passed a law requiring judges to start with a presumption of 50-50 shared parenting time, then apply the facts of the case from there. Do you support shared parenting as a starting point for negotiating custody schedules?

Which approach is better, Virginia’s or Kentucky’s?
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Parallel parenting can work in high conflict custody cases

A distinguished task force of judges, lawyers, and family court professionals did a great job of defining shared parenting to include parallel parenting.

“even in circumstances where shared parenting may appear difficult, depending on the child’s age, maturity, and other circumstances,  parents still could have minimal communication and coordination and yet share the raising of their children in what is called “parallel parenting” (an arrangement in which parents agree to exchange important information about the child’s welfare, but otherwise permit each other to parent the child autonomously).”

Source: “CLOSING THE GAP: RESEARCH, POLICY, PRACTICE, AND SHARED PARENTING” by Marsha Kline Pruett and J. Herbie DiFonzo. (Family Court Review, Vol. 52, No 2, April 2014).

Should family courts insist on parallel parenting in high conflict cases, except where one parent is unfit?

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Family Court Professionals Endorse Shared Parenting

A three-day Task Force meeting of “family law experts” (i.e., legal experts, mental health practitioners, conflict resolution practitioners, educators, judges, court services administrators, and researchers) reached strong consensus on Shared Parenting.

“Consensus Point 1: Promotion of shared parenting constitutes a public health issue that extends beyond a mere legal concern. Parents who collaborate in childrearing have a positive effect on their children’s development and well-being. Parents who engage in protracted and/or severe conflict that includes rejecting or undermining the other parent have a negative impact. The potential for shared parenting is present for children regardless of the family structure in which they live, and it represents a key protective factor in (a) helping children adjust to separation and divorce and (b) establishing an ongoing healthy family environment in which to rear children and facilitate high-quality parenting. (p. 152)”

Source: “CLOSING THE GAP: RESEARCH, POLICY, PRACTICE, AND SHARED PARENTING” by Marsha Kline Pruett and J. Herbie DiFonzo. (Family Court Review, Vol. 52, No 2, April 2014).Facebooktwittergoogle_plusmailby feather

Does Shared Parenting affect early childhood development?

A renowned Cambridge University Professor, Dr. Michael Lamb, says that young children benefit by forming attachment to both parents, and other caring involved adults as well. Speaking at the International Conference on Shared Parenting 2017 in Boston Prof. Lamb said that a child’s attachments to caring adults develop in the first 7-8 months. He spoke on Tuesday, May 30. Prof. Lamb is widely credited with developing the science of early childhood attachment formation.

He said that young children who spend time, including overnights, with one caring attachment figure are not harmed by the separation from another parent.

Prof. Lamb summarized five studies of attachment formation in cases where parents live apart. He parsed the studies according to the selection of their sample and the validity of their outcome measurements. Giving greater weight to studies with better samples and stronger methods, he concluded that a child’s attachment to more than one adult produces better outcomes. He pointed out that this likely follows from the emotional support one parent can give the child when the other parent is experiencing difficulties. He called for more research on causal factors.

Bottom line: overnights with each parent in different homes help young children form strong attachments.Facebooktwittergoogle_plusmailby feather

Exchange Information with Shared Parenting Experts: International Conference in Boston, May 29-30

The National Parents Organization (NPO.org) is sponsoring a group of experts on shared parenting. Some highlights from the NPO website, http://npo-icsp2017.org/ :

Research suggests that fully half of troubled children and adolescents derive from conflicted, separated and divorced families. The faculty will delve into the relationship between different types of post-divorce parenting arrangements and children’s subjective and objective outcomes, their attachment to parental figures, and specific issues such as age and developmental level, high conflict, domestic violence, and parental alienation. The conference offers the rare opportunity to interact with leading legal and mental health scholars from around the world on this important topic. The program will include plenary sessions, panel discussions, question and answer sessions, and break-out workshops.

Given the high prevalence of conflicted, separated and divorced families, this conference will be of great benefit to all varieties of child and family practitioners and scholars, including any who deal with family policy, family law, psychology, child mental and physical health, alienation, domestic violence or family dynamics This is an unusual opportunity to learn from so many distinguished scholars from Australia to Europe to North America, any of whom would qualify as a keynote speaker, all at one conference. Information on continuing education can be found in the Program.

Email info@sharedparentinginc.org for a pdf of the full program.

Registration and housing information: http://npo-icsp2017.org/registrationhousing/Facebooktwittergoogle_plusmailby feather